IRS Revenue Procedure Eases Correction Procedures
(Posted on April 22, 2019 by )


Internal Revenue ServiceThe IRS has just issued a new revenue procedure, Rev. Proc. 2019-19, which limits the number of plans that have to make IRS filings under the Voluntary Correction Program (“VCP”) in order to correct past errors.

The guidance adds provisions allowing plans to be corrected under the Self-Correction Program (“SCP”), which does not require an IRS filing, in the case of two sorts of errors:

  • Plan document failures
  • Correction by retroactive plan amendment

The revenue procedure also loosens certain requirements for dealing with plan loan failures.
Read more.

New PowerPoint: Avoiding Fringe Benefit Pitfalls: Tax Traps, De Minimis Rules, Correction Procedures, Fiduciary Risks
(Posted on April 4, 2019 by )


Strafford webinarA recent CLE webinar guided benefits counsel and advisers on recent rules and regulations in providing fringe benefits to employees and avoiding dangerous and costly issues that arise regarding such benefits including personal liability under ERISA. The panel discussed key considerations in structuring fringe benefits, tax traps, de minimis rules, effective correction procedures and methods to minimize fiduciary risks. The PowerPoint presentation for the portion of the webinar dealing with tax aspects is now available at this link.

 

 

New article: Section 403(b) Plan Design and Compliance
(Posted on December 5, 2018 by )


Lexis Practice Advisor articleA new article, Section 403(b) Plan Design and Compliance, discusses the rules that apply when eligible tax-exempt organizations establish tax-sheltered annuities, custodial accounts, or retirement income accounts, as described in Section 403(b) of the Internal Revenue Code (403(b) plans).

This article addresses the following topics:

Read more.

New Article: Pre-Approved 403(b) Plans
(Posted on November 29, 2018 by )


Internal Revenue ServiceIn March 2017, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) began issuing advisory and opinion letters to the first preapproved retirement programs described in Internal Revenue Code (I.R.C.) § 403(b) (403(b) plans). A new article, Pre-Approved 403(b) Plans, discusses preapproved 403(b) plans, including their advantages, legal pitfalls, and other issues that an eligible employer may consider when determining whether to convert its existing 403(b) plan into a preapproved plan.

The major topics are:

Read more.

New Article: Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Rules for Tax-Indifferent Entities (Section 457A)
(Posted on October 26, 2018 by )


Lexis Practice AdvisorA new article, Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Rules for Tax-Indifferent Entities (Section 457A), discusses the rules that apply to deferred compensation plans maintained by certain corporations located in tax haven jurisdictions and partnerships owned by such corporations and/or by tax-exempt organizations. Topics covered include:

Read more.

New article: Executive Compensation Arrangements for Tax-Exempt Organizations
(Posted on September 14, 2018 by )


Lexis Practice AdvisorTax-exempt organizations face special legal challenges in developing compensation packages for their executives. A new article published in the Lexis Practice Advisor provides practical guidance on developing benefits for executives of nonprofits.

This article is divided into the following main topics:

Read more.

New article: Pre-approved Plan Design and Compliance
(Posted on August 13, 2018 by )


Lexis Practice AdvisorWith the IRS cutting back on determination letters for individually designed plans, more and more employers are switching to pre-approved plans. An article recently published in the Lexis Practice Advisor discusses practical considerations involved with such plans. Topics include:

New Immigration Rules Create Issues for Employer Health Plans
(Posted on August 9, 2018 by )


Department of Homeland SecurityA leaked draft of Proposed Department of Homeland Security (“DHS”) regulations indicates that certain non-US citizens may be disadvantaged in extending or adjusting their immigration status if they obtain health insurance coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace (“Marketplace”) set up under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) or Medicaid, or obtain benefits under the Children’s Health Insurance Program (“CHIP”) for their dependents (even US citizen dependents). From an employee benefits perspective, the proposed rules have three effects on employers:

  1. Employees may have questions about whether they can or should switch coverage from the Marketplace or CHIP to the employer’s health plan.
  2. Employers are required to give notices to employees on hiring about the availability of health insurance through the Marketplace, and annually about the availability of CHIP. Employers may want to consider adding information to these notices regarding the potential impact on immigration of accepting either of these benefits.
  3. Employers that wish to retain non-US citizen employees may wish to improve health benefits (particularly for dependents) to discourage use of the Marketplace or CHIP.

The change in regulations would have a number of effects on employers who hire non-US citizens, particularly in instances in which the employer is sponsoring them (such as for an H-1B visa or a green card) which are beyond the scope of this post. However, this post discusses the specific impact on employee benefits of the proposed regulations, and potential employer responses to them. Read more.

New Article: Substantial Risk of Forfeiture
(Posted on July 25, 2018 by )


Lexis Practice AdvisorAn article recently published in the Lexis Practice Advisor, Substantial Risk of Forfeiture, discusses the concept of substantial risk of forfeiture (SRF) under sections 83, 409A, 457(f), 457A, and 3121(v)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code and the different consequences of the failure to achieve a SRF under each such section.

Topics covered are:

It is accompanied by a Substantial Risk of Forfeiture Comparison Chart, which summarizes the rules.

Sample Subrogation and Reimbursement Clauses for Summary Plan Description Now Available
(Posted on May 25, 2018 by )


Lexis Practice AdvisorA new article by Carol V. Calhoun, published by Lexis Practice Advisor, provides sample subrogation and reimbursement clauses to be used in a summary plan description. Such clauses are typically used in an instance in which an employer’s health or disability plan wants to avoid a situation in which a participant gets a double recovery for the same illness or injury. For example, an employee covered by both the employer’s health plan and a spouse’s health plan should not have the same medical expenses paid by both plans. Or an individual who is hit by a car, and recovers lost wages from the driver’s insurance company, should not also be able to receive disability benefits for the same period.

You can see a copy of the piece at this link.